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20130201
20130201
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
an extension of the debt ceiling, raised the debt ceiling for the future. and i didn't vote for that. there were no cuts included in that bill. the only cut that we have ever come up with is this 1.2 trillion, because the committee, the special select committee couldn't come up with a spending reductions, were now going to have as part as sequestration. i don't really believe in across the board cuts. i think that's irresponsible. but in the absence of cutting spending someplace to replace those 1.2 -- >> got to take it where you get it. >> it's not the only way we're going to get it. >> it's never a good time to cut spending. it's one of the things i've learned. i guess i saw it years ago when i worked down there. but reporting on this thing night after night, one of the things i learned, senator moran, is it's never a good time to cut spending. so march 1st is an interesting deadline. >> i'm not voting to set the sequester aside unless we cut the 1.2 trillion someplace else. >> good luck on that. senator jerry moran of kansas, thank you very much, sir. we appreciate it. >> thank yo
threatening to vote against raising the debt ceiling. if congress didn't act by august 2, the federal government would be unable to pay its bills. >> in 2010, when all these republicans were running for congress, ma of em awed tea partiers and the rest of them riding the tea party wave, the subject of the impending debt ceiling came up frequently and virtually all of them campaigned saying... pledging not to raise the debt ceiling. >> narrator: early on, republican freshmen attended orientation sessions. republican strategist frank luntz ran one of them. >> and i asked the question, how many of you are going to vote for the debt ceiling? and only three or four of them raised their hands. and i said, if you vote for the debt ceiling, the people who put you in office are going to knock you out. >> if you vote for the debt ceiling, you're voting for your own death certificate, political death certificate. >> narrator: for his part, the president decided to try something new: personal politics. he figured he could connect to the republican leader, john boehner. >> obama told his staff, jo
down, not up. lori: the senate approved a house plan to approve the debt ceiling and hold off on congressional pay if they don't get a budget deal for the next ten years. you say this is more of a risk and even the fiscal cliff was. >> oh, yes. the debt ceiling is a potentially large fiscal contraction like the fiscal cliff was. even bigger, actually, if you do the math. debt ceiling is you cannot borrow, so you have to balance the budget tomorrow. in addition to that, there was the kind of not very real threat that we might default on the national debt or postpone payments, so you're playing with a combination of a big fiscal contraction and the possibility of triggering a financial crisis also. lori: i want to ask you about your book. after the music stopped, but about the financial crisis, to a dozen 7-8. looking back, said always 2020, what were the best actions taken by the federal government and the worst? >> at think there were three. in net you a tie for first? >> you know how tv works. >> one was tart. very unpopular, but effective and turn a profit for the taxpayer.
debt ceiling negotiations, anything that washington does that adds to the uncertainty certainly doesn't help the economy. so i think most people would like to see these people sort of get their act together before the deadline, hopefully. >> well, in fact, senator roy blunt just blamed uncertainty. let me play that. >> uncertainty is probably even a greater problem than contraction. if we knew what the government spending was going to be with some certainty, that would be better than this constant not knowing. we're on the 60-day clock and then on the 90-day clock. we need to get on a four and five-year clock. and that's why a budget and appropriations bills will make a difference, chuck. >> what are the chances, michael, of those things happening? >> well, you know, i think a long-term solution doesn't look very practical right now. and one reason is that members of congress like mr. blunt, republicans, are -- i think that it's more important not to give more ground on taxes than it is to create certainty. so i think everyone agrees that uncertainty is a problem. i think basically ev
to bring you back for this. quick thought about this, can we get rid of the debt ceiling? >> iveng what we're seeing is some of the political brinksman ship around the debt ceiling may be a thing of the past. the renls certainly got hurt politically trying to use that tool as leverage. 6/hopefully it's an indication that that particular kind of brinksman ship is behind us. >> we'll see. i never put it beyond politicians. when the story changes, they'll change. julie, now win promise you can have your coffee break or tea break. try tea, it's very nice. english breakfast. very good thing to have first thing in the morning. we'll come back to you, jules, julia. >>> in the united states, in addition to the jobs report, there are some other pieces of the economic data. the final look at january consumer sentiment is out at 9:55 a.m. eastern. on the corporate front, exxon mobil, chevron, merck, tyson foods all report earnings before the bell. january sales are also out. they're expected to be seen at the strong rate compared to last year. this is all thanks to pent up demand as well as the impro
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)